What annoys me living in the Spanish village, LA IGLESUELA – disadvantages

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What annoys me living in the Spanish village, LA IGLESUELA – disadvantages

A Spanish village is a great place for a quiet life and remote work. In an earlier post, I described the advantages of La Iglesuela, a tiny village located 120 km from Madrid. This time, however, I will present things that I do not like, and they often irritate me. Here are the facts that make life here not as perfect as it may seem.

#Tiny gardens or no garden

The houses are very squeezed and not large, many do not even have a garden, and leaving home from the door you go straight to the street. Inhabitants of the village have a solution for a no – garden problem – they buy a piece of land just over the country’s residential area and create a “pajar” – means something like polish garden plots for the people leaving in flats. I always associate a village with large houses, a garden and a spacious yard, as it is in Poland.

 

#No privacy

As you probably guess, through such a compressed building, also from the street someone can look through the window and see what you watch on TV, or what you cook for dinner. Thank God we have the kitchen from the garden, where no one can see us, but the living room … I understand that someone can look through accidentally, but if during the passing the head is directed all the time towards the window, I get angry with the Spanish lifestyle 😀 Damn! Where is this privacy in your own home? : P

#Lack of fresh vegetables and fruits

As is very hot in this area, growing vegetables is not popular. The animal breeding is more common here. I did not notice the richness of fresh vegetables and fruits in the village. We have a “frutero” man here who drives a van and sells vegetables and fruits – but the carrot is in the same packaging I buy in the supermarket.

 

#No vacancies

I am happy with my remote job and I would never ever exchange it for another. In fact, I would never find it in La Iglesuela in my profession. Spaniards have the same problem, that’s why mainly pensioners live here.

 

#No clubs

Exactly … I am still before 30 and I feel would like sometimes to get crazy: D. There are parties that I mentioned in the advantages of living in the Spanish village – concerts in the summer or in the bar in the nearby village, but this is not enough for me: D. To go crazy I have to beat 120 km to Madrid, which is terribly burdensome.

#Heat

The summer is very hot and dry. It’s hard to work, even at home in front of a computer. In old construction, it is true that it is cooler due to thick stone walls, but it is still hot, and unfortunately, the air conditioning does not occur everywhere. In the middle of summer, you can go for a walk only after 22, when the sun goes down and it will be a little cooler. The 40-degree heat is really tiring.

#Poor social life

I do not meet new friends here. I miss meeting new people but also spending time with old friends. I will not call at any time to my best saying “come on, we are going for wine”. When I was in Shenzhen, every week I have been meeting a new person with whom I could have fun, La Iglesuela is a total contrast. Well, comparing a 400-person village with a 12-million-strong city make difference.

#More advanced stores far away

I love to cook, often unusual dishes. Wherever we shop, in a nearby village 12 km away, I have never found the ingredients I need. I will not make sushi without a nori, a Balinese chicken without lemongrass, or a red borscht without beetroots (yes, it’s hard to find fresh beetroots here). Once in a while, we go shopping to the larger city of Talavera, which we reach after 40 minutes driving or we just buy it online.

Nowhere is perfect, there are better and worse places.  Despite the disadvantages, I like living in the Spanish countryside :).

By | 2017-12-13T18:08:42+00:00 December 13th, 2017|Europe, SPAIN|Comments Off on What annoys me living in the Spanish village, LA IGLESUELA – disadvantages

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